Meetings

The Cincinnati Radiation Society Chapter of the Health Physics Society

in cooperation with the

Ohio Valley Section of the American Industrial Hygiene Association

Presents:

Phillip H. Jenkins, Ph.D., CHP

Senior Health Physicist

Bowser-Morner

September 30, 2021

Presenting:

The Mound Radon Program and the Bowser-Morner Radon Reference Laboratory

PHILLIP H. JENKINS received a B.S. in Chemical Engineering in 1970, an M.S. in Bionucleonics in 1972, and a Ph.D. in Bionucleonics in 1975, all from Purdue University. From 1975 to 1978, Phil was a Sr. Health Physicist at the Tennessee Valley Authority in Muscle Shoals, AL. From 1978 to 1991, he held several positions in the Environmental Section of the Mound Facility. In 1991, Phil became an employee of Bowser-Morner, Inc. in Dayton, creating a private radon reference facility similar to the one formerly at Mound. Presently, Phil serves mostly as a technical adviser to the facility.

Phil was named a Fellow of the Health Physics Society in 2020 and this year became a 50-year member of the Society. He has held Comprehensive Certification since 1980 and is now a CHP Emeritus. Phil served on the board of the American Association of Radon Scientists and Technologists (AARST) for over 25 years in every position including President. He was a member of the Radiation Advisory Council of the Ohio Department of Health for 20 years and was a member of a Working Group of the World Health Organization’s International Radon Project. He wrote a chapter on the behavior of radon, thoron and actinon for a CRC Handbook on Radioactive Air Sampling Methods. He has served on several standards working groups. Phil received the Hoover-Newton Award in 2012 for his contributions to the field of radiation air monitoring. He received the Scott-Åkerblom Award in 2014 for innovative contributions to radon measurements. Phil has published articles and book chapters, refereed articles, presented numerous talks and taught training and continuing education courses related to radon measurements and quality assurance.

Phil’s avocation is music; he sang in the Purdue Glee Club, the Dayton Philharmonic Choir and for 20 years in the semi-professional choral group “Musica.” Phil is married to Rev. Bev Jenkins, retired minister and chaplain. They live in Centerville, Ohio and have two grown children and seven grandchildren.

Time:

6:00 PM to ~7:00 PM

Tickets:

No charge.

Please RSVP to the CRS Secretary for login information.


The Cincinnati Radiation Society Chapter of the Health Physics Society

in cooperation with the

Ohio Valley Section of the American Industrial Hygiene Association

Presents:

Mutty M. Sharfi, CHP, CIH

Senior Health Physicist

MJW Technical Services

April 21, 2021

Presenting:

How the worlds of Health Physics and Industrial Hygiene interrelate

Mr. Mutty Marc Sharfi received his bachelors from Kansas State University and his masters from the University of Cincinnati, both in Nuclear Engineering. He is certified as a Health Physicist, by the American Academy of Health Physics, and as an Industrial Hygienist, by the American Board of Industrial Hygiene. Mr. Sharfi has over twenty years of combined nuclear, radiological, and safety experience. His previous experiences include being a nuclear reactor operator for a TRIGA Mark 11 nuclear test reactor and as a Senior Internal Dosimetrist at the DOE Mound Site. Since 2003, Mr. Sharfi has been a Senior Health Physicist with MJW Technical Services. Mr. Sharfi's primarily duty is as the Principal Scientist for Atomic Weapons Employers, in support of NIOSH to assess worker exposures under the Energy Employees Occupational Illness Compensation Program Act. In addition, he supports numerous short-term contracts for commercial and government sites that mainly deal with the development of safety programs, worker exposure analysis, and training.

Abstract:

This presentation will discuss personnel monitoring lessons learned from a dose reconstruction and radiation compensation perspective. Personnel monitoring has changed many times through the history of radiation monitoring. Some changes have been good, such as monitoring workers via a personal dosimeter, while other changes (decreases in personnel monitoring in favor of area, group, or co-worker monitoring) have led to challenges from a dose reconstruction perspective. The scaling back of bioassay monitoring has also led to challenges especially when a worker presents with a reported injury (cancer) and the job of the Health Physicist is to reconstruct the worker’s dose. Was the worker exposed to radiation? Was the dose less than monitoring requirements? How do you prove or demonstrate this? When personnel monitoring data is not available, alternate radiation monitoring data becomes critical. This presentation will discuss the availability of alternate monitoring data and potential limitations of some monitoring data.

Time:

6:00 PM to 8:00 PM

Tickets:

Tickets may be bought at the OVS Eventbrite webpage.


The Cincinnati Radiation Society Chapter of the Health Physics Society

Presents:

John J. Cardarelli II, Ph.D., CHP, CIH, PE

Research Health Physicist

National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health

March 18, 2021

President-elect designate John Cardarelli is a Research Health Physicist with the National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health. He has nearly 30 years working in various radiological fields with the Centers for Disease Control and the Environmental Protection Agency, including epidemiology, exposure assessment, risk communication, emergency response, environmental characterization and cleanup policies, aerial and ground-based wide-area characterization, dose reconstructions and non-ionizing radiation. He also is an Assistant Adjunct Professor at the University of Cincinnati, College of Medicine, Department of Environmental Health and recently retired as a Captain from the U.S. Public Health Service.

He received his B.S. in Nuclear Engineering, an M.S. in Health Physics and Ph.D. in Industrial Hygiene/Environmental Health from the University of Cincinnati. He holds a Professional Engineering License (nuclear specialty), and is board certified in both Industrial Hygiene and Health Physics.

Abstract:

This presentation will summarize news about recent HPS accomplishments, upcoming meetings, our support to academic institutions over the years, and the latest updates to the 2021-2022 strategic plan. A discussion session will follow to listen to your chapter needs so he can bring any message back to the HPS leadership.

Time:

6:00 PM to 8:00 PM

Tickets:

No charge.

Please RSVP to the CRS Secretary for login information.

Tim Taulbee, PhD, CHP

The Cincinnati Radiation Society Chapter of the Health Physics Society

Presents:

Tim Taulbee, Ph.D., CHP

Associate Director of Science

Division of Compensation Analysis and Support

National Institute of Occupational Safety and Health

Thursday, January 23, 2020

Presenting:

Personnel Monitoring Lessons Learned – A Dose Reconstruction Perspective

Dr. Taulbee is the Associate Director for Science (ADS) for the National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health’s (NIOSH’s) Dose Reconstruction Program. Dr. Taulbee has worked in this program since its inception in 2001 and conducted the first dose reconstruction for a claimant filing for compensation under the Energy Employees Occupational Illness Compensation Program Act (EEOICPA) of 2000. Dr. Taulbee earned his Doctorate in Nuclear Engineering from the University of Cincinnati and previously worked at the Mound Plant from 1991 to 1997. In 1997, he joined NIOSH conducting dose reconstruction in support of radiation epidemiologic studies. His work led to a Health Physicist position as the External Dosimetry Lead for the NIOSH Dose Reconstruction Program.

Dr. Taulbee has served in many roles within the Health Physics Society including Chair of the Membership Committee, Program Committee, Program Committee Task Force Chair for both the Baltimore and Orlando Annual Meetings and currently as a Director of the Health Physics Society. He is the HPS Director Liaison for the Cincinnati Radiation Society. Dr. Taulbee has been a Certified Health Physicist since 1998 and also served as the Chair of the Professional Standards and Ethics Committee of the American Academy of Health Physics (AAHP).

Abstract:

This presentation will discuss personnel monitoring lessons learned from a dose reconstruction and radiation compensation perspective. Personnel monitoring has changed many times through the history of radiation monitoring. Some changes have been good, such as monitoring workers via a personal dosimeter, while other changes (decreases in personnel monitoring in favor of area, group, or co-worker monitoring) have led to challenges from a dose reconstruction perspective. The scaling back of bioassay monitoring has also led to challenges especially when a worker presents with a reported injury (cancer) and the job of the Health Physicist is to reconstruct the worker’s dose. Was the worker exposed to radiation? Was the dose less than monitoring requirements? How do you prove or demonstrate this? When personnel monitoring data is not available, alternate radiation monitoring data becomes critical. This presentation will discuss the availability of alternate monitoring data and potential limitations of some monitoring data.

Location:

Firehouse Grill & Brewery

4785 Lake Forest Dr.

Cincinnati, OH 45242

Schedule:

5:30 pm: Social

6:00 pm: Dinner

6:55 pm: Welcome & announcements

7:00 pm: Speaker

Dinner:

$30.00 per person.

No charge for students.

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The Cincinnati Radiation Society Chapter of the Health Physics Society

Presents:

Stu Hinnefeld

Director

Division of Compensation Analysis and Support

National Institute of Occupational Safety and Health

Thursday, May 30, 2019

Presenting:

Personal Perspective: Fernald dust collector release, 1984.

Stu Hinnefeld is the Director of NIOSH’s Division of Compensation Analysis and Support (DCAS), which performs the Health & Humans Services’ responsibilities under the Energy Employees Occupational Illness Compensation program. Specifically, DCAS evaluates the feasibility of completing radiation dose reconstructions and performs dose reconstructions for claimants who worked at facilities that were or are involved in the nuclear weapons program. Stu started at DCAS in 2003 and has been the Division Director since 2009.

Prior to working for DCAS he held several radiological protection and health & safety positions as a contractor employee at the DOE’s Fernald uranium processing plant. He worked at Fernald from 1981 to 2003.

Abstract:

In September 1984, the Department of Energy announced that its uranium processing facility at Fernald, Ohio, which was operated by NLO, Inc., had released 124 kg of slightly-enriched uranium to the environment due to a malfunctioning emissions control dust collector. It was further revealed that, before the announcement, the release had continued for several weeks despite indications it was occurring. This event and the following scrutiny led to lawsuits by the plant’s neighbors and workers, and ultimately gave Fernald the reputation as something of an environmental disaster. Discussion will describe the events of the uranium release, and the context from which NLO management viewed the release.

Location:

Fernald Preserve Visitors Center

7400 Willey Road

Hamilton, OH 45013

Schedule:

5:30 pm: Social

6:00 pm: Site-hosted Museum Tour / Dinner

6:55 pm: Welcome & announcements

7:00 pm: Speaker

Dinner:

$20.00 per person.

No charge for students.

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The Cincinnati Radiation Society Chapter of the Health Physics Society

Presents:

Eric M. Goldin, Ph.D., CHP

HPS President-elect

Friday, November 2, 2018

Presenting:

Nuclear Plant Decommissioning – Challenges and Opportunities

Eric Goldin is a radiation safety specialist with 38 years of experience in power reactor health physics supporting both worker and public radiation safety programs. He has been a Certified Health Physicist since 1984 and is active in the industry. Eric received a BS in Nuclear Engineering from the University of Arizona, an MS in Nuclear Engineering (Health Physics specialty) from Texas A&M University, and a Ph.D. in Biophysics from the University of Texas Graduate School of Biomedical Sciences, Houston. Eric has been a member of National Council on Radiation Protection & Measurements Program Area Committee 2 since 2004, contributing to 4 reports, and was recently elected to the Council. He is an active member of the Health Physics Society, served on the Board of Directors, several Committees and Sections, and on the American Board of Health Physics. Eric was awarded HPS Fellow status in 2012 and is currently HPS President-Elect.

Abstract:

Many US nuclear power plants are preparing for retirement due to aging and market forces. Some ceased operations in recent years, some retired decades ago. Commercial nuclear power plant decommissioning presents many challenges for radiation safety professionals, many of these challenges are not typical for operating power plants. Radiation protection controls apply to everything from the cutup of highly activated reactor internals to the measurement of environmental levels of radionuclides in soil. This presentation will provide a brief overview of:

  • plant operations, followed by shutdown – modification of programs, staff reductions

  • reactor internals cutup, large component removal – high activity, particles, transportation

  • dismantlement – materials management and site restoration

  • used fuel management, ISFSI loading – neutrons, decontamination

  • MARSSIM surveys – scrutiny, license termination.

All of the above require comprehensive radiation safety program execution, some operational programs are retained, some revised, and some new ones are necessary, all to be accomplished during staffing reductions, responsibility shifts, and regulatory and public oversight.

Location:

Hofbräuhaus Newport at The Levee

200 East 3rd St.

Newport, KY 41071

Schedule:

6:00 pm: Social

6:55 pm: Welcome & announcements

7:00 pm: Speaker

Dinner:

$35.00 per person (Meet & Greet only)

$50.00 per person (Symposium and Meet & Greet)

** Pre-payment preferred using ORVC website.

The American Academy of Health Physics grants 7 Continuing Education Credits (CEC) for attendance to this symposium, and 2 CECs for the Meet & Greet.

The Commission on Accreditation of Medical Physics Education Programs will grant 6.5 CECs for attendance to this symposium.

This event is being coordinated along with the Ohio River Valley Chapter of the American Association of Physicists in Medicine as part of their 2018 Fall Educational Symposium being held on Saturday, November 3, 2018 at the 21c Museum Hotel in Cincinnati, OH. Further information and payment information may be found at: http://chapter.aapm.org/orv/meetings/next_meeting.html.

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The Cincinnati Radiation Society Chapter of the Health Physics Society

Presents:

Dr. Nolan Hertel

HPS President-elect

GW Woodruff School of Mechanical Engineering

Nuclear and Radiological Engineering Program

Georgia Institute of Technology

Wednesday, November 8, 2017

Presenting:

Radiation Protection: What we know, don’t know and need to know?

Dr. Nolan Hertel is a Professor Nuclear and Radiological Engineering at Georgia Institute of Technology.

Hertel has been a member of HPS since 1981 and has served the society through his participation on the board of directors and on various Society committees. In 2016 the society presented Hertel the HPS Distinguished Scientific Achievement Award, recognizing his contributions to the scientific field of radiation safety and for his accomplishments regarding the practice and advancement of the profession of health physics.

Hertel earned his BS and MS degrees in Nuclear Engineering from Texas A&M University and his Ph.D. from the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign. He previously served as a faculty member at the University of Texas at Austin. In 1993, he moved to the Georgia Institute of Technology to join what was then the Nuclear Engineering and Health Physics Program.

While at Georgia Tech he has held numerous positions including Chair of the Health Physics and Radiological Engineering Research Group, Radiological Safety Officer, Director of the Neely Research Center, and Research Fellow of the Sam Nunn Security Program of the Georgia Tech School of International Affairs.

Currently in addition to his faculty position, he holds a joint faculty appointment in the Environmental Sciences Division at Oak Ridge National Laboratory and currently is the Acting Director of their Center for Radiation Protection Knowledge.

Abstract:

On June 5-6, 2017, a Radiation Protection Research Needs Workshop was held in Oak Ridge, Tennessee hosted by Oak Ridge Associated Universities, Oak Ridge National Laboratory’s Center for Radiation Protection Knowledge and the Health Physics Society. The workshop was held to facilitate dialogue among radiation protection stakeholders in the federal/state governments and the scientific community. A short summary of that meeting will be presented and an opportunity will be provided for the local chapter to provide further input to the development of what will hopefully become a national strategic agenda for radiation protection research and development needs.

Location:

VEGA Americas, Inc. - Cincinnati Campus

4141 Rosslyn Dr., Cincinnati, OH 45209

Schedule:

6:00 pm: Social

6:20 pm: Dinner

6:55 pm: Welcome & announcements

7:00 pm: Speaker

Dinner:

$25.00 per person

No charge for students.

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The Cincinnati Radiation Society Chapter of the Health Physics Society

Presents:

John Cardarelli II, Ph.D., CHP, CIH, PE, RSO and Brant Ulsh, Ph.D., CHP

Wednesday, May 17, 2017

(a follow-up to our April 13, 2017 meeting)

Presenting:

Current low dose radiation protection policies: State of the science and public health implications

Drs. Cardarelli and Ulsh will discuss how regulators in the US regulate low dose and dose-rate (LDDR) radiation. They will explore logical issues arising in discussions of regulatory policies. They will also examine the state of the science that underpins current regulatory philosophy, and present recent relevant scientific evidence. They will describe public health implications of current LDDR radiation protection policies and real-world outcomes (e.g., Fukushima). They will conclude by presenting some thoughts and suggestions on possible future improvements in regulatory policy.

CAPT John Cardarelli is a US Public Health Service Officer detailed to the US Environmental Protection Agency (EPA). He serves as a Health Physicist on the CBRN Consequence Management Advisory Team (CMAT) to provide scientific and technical support for local & state governments, federal agencies and international partners on radiological issues associated with (1) emergency response, (2) risk assessment, (3) policy development, (4) decontamination technologies, and (5) environmental characterization. He is the lead for developing and maintaining the EPA airborne radiological detection capability within the Airborne Spectral Photometric Environmental Collection Technology (ASPECT) program and serves as the radiation safety officer for the NRC licensed materials within CBRN CMAT. He also is an Assistant Adjunct Professor at the University of Cincinnati, College of Medicine, Department of Environmental Health.

Dr. Ulsh is a Certified Health Physicist, and has over thirty years of academic training, and governmental, academic, and private industry work experience in radiation fields including health physics, nuclear engineering, radiobiology and radioecology. He is currently a Principal Health Physicist with M. H. Chew & Associates in Cincinnati. He earned a Bachelor of Science degree in Nuclear Engineering and a Master of Science degree in Health Physics, both from the University of Cincinnati, and a Ph.D. in Radiological Health Sciences from Colorado State University. He has authored one book chapter, 17 peer-reviewed publications, 22 scientific presentations, 10 scientific poster presentations, and 6 scientific abstracts. He serves as an affiliate faculty member of Colorado State University, and the Northern Ontario School of Medicine. He has held numerous leadership positions in both the Cincinnati Radiation Society, and the Health Physics Society, and he served as a member of the International Radiation Protection Association Radiation Protection Strategy and Practice Committee.

Location:

Envision Cinemas Bar & Grille (VIP Room)

4780 Cornell Rd, Blue Ash, OH 45241

Schedule:

5:30 pm: Social

6:00 pm: Dinner

6:50 pm: Welcome & announcements

7:00 pm: Speakers

Dinner:

$25.00 per person

No charge for students.

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The Cincinnati Radiation Society Chapter of the Health Physics Society

Presents:

Scott J. Winters

Nuclear Engineer

VEGA Americas, Inc.

Tuesday, February 28, 2017

Presenting:

Source Security Classification and Future Impact to Regulators and Licensees

Since 1986, Mr. Winters has worked with companies, organizations and agencies to develop comprehensive radiation safety programs for industrial applications. Industries served include the oil and gas, petro-chemical, refining, steel, paper and mining. He has also been an advisor, instructor, presenter and/or affiliated with the following organizations: Interstate Oil and Gas Compact Commission (IOGCC), Conference of Radiation Control Program Directors (CRCPD), Institute of Scrap Recycling, National Safety Council, International Pipe Inspector’s Association, Steel Manufacturer’s Association, Canadian Occupational Safety, International Petroleum Environmental Consortium (IPEC), American Society of Safety Engineers, Industrial Hygiene Association and National Health Physics Society. Scott was an active supporter of the South Texas Chapter’s affiliate program for many years and still attends various HPS chapter meetings.

Scott has owned and/or served as a board member for Suntrac Services, Industrial Safety Consulting Services, NORMEX International, REMide and was manager of industrial radiation services at Chase Environmental Group. He currently works as a Nuclear Engineer at VEGA Americas in Cincinnati, Ohio, where his primary duties include programmatic support for domestic and international compliance.

Experience includes development, coordination and implementation of health physics monitoring and protection protocols for TE-NORM in support of over one-million man hours associated with industrial maintenance outages. He has been a major contributor for research and field testing of patented chelation technology for decontaminating critical petro-chemical components, and for research at the University of Pittsburgh for pilot testing of isotope extraction from waste, and protective metal barriers, which resulted in thirteen (13) patents. Scott’s favorite memories include summer surveys in the Nevada desert and tug boat cruises on the Mississippi River tracking orphaned sources!

Location:

VEGA Americas, Inc. - Cincinnati Campus

4141 Rosslyn Dr., Cincinnati, OH 45209

Schedule:

5:30 pm: Social

6:00 pm: Dinner

6:50 pm: Welcome & announcements

7:00 pm: Speaker

Dinner:

$25.00 per person

No charge for students.

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The Cincinnati Radiation Society Chapter of the Health Physics Society

Presents:

Lieutenant Colonel David L. Pugh

Chief of the Consultative Services Division

Air Force School of Aerospace Medicine

Wednesday, November 9, 2016

Presenting:

An Overview of the Air Force Radiation Assessment Team

Lt. Col. David L. Pugh is Chief of the Consultative Services Division, Air Force School of Aerospace Medicine, where he is responsible for providing occupational and environmental health consult services for the United States Air Force. He is also Team Chief of the Air Force Radiation Assessment Team, which provides rapid, global response to radiological incidents and accidents. Lt. Col. Pugh has held multiple bioenvironmental engineering and health physics positions at base level and Headquarters Air Staff. Previously, he served as Executive Officer for the Deputy Assistant Secretary of the Air Force for Environment, Safety, and Occupational Health, Air Force Pentagon, Washington, DC. He also was assigned as a health physicist for the National Nuclear Security Administration’s Defense Programs Office in Washington, DC.

Lt. Col. Pugh is board certified in health physics and in 2007 was recognized as the ‘Air Force Health Physicist of the Year.’ In 2008, he deployed to Iraq in support of Operation Iraqi Freedom.

Education:

1994 Bachelor of Science, Physics, Bridgewater College, Bridgewater VA

1996 Master of Science, Nuclear Engineering & Engineering Physics, University of Wisconsin-Madison

2014 Air Force Fellow – Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge TN

Abstract:

The Air Force Radiation Assessment Team (AFRAT) is a consultative team for the Department of Defense for radiological incidents and accidents capable of providing on-scene health effects expertise, commander guidance, radiological monitoring, environmental sampling, and dosimetry. The AFRAT team was established in 1967 and is currently managed by the USAF School of Aerospace Medicine at Wright Patterson AFB, Ohio. The AFRAT team participates in multi-agency exercises and has a 40+ year history of providing vital support to the Air Force and Department of Defense.

Location:

BRAVO! Cucina Italiana

9436 Waterfront Dr., West Chester, OH 45069

Schedule:

5:30 pm: Social

6:00 pm: Dinner

6:50 pm: Welcome & announcements

7:00 pm: Speaker

Dinner:

$27.00 per person

No charge for students.

The Cincinnati Radiation Society Chapter of the Health Physics Society

Presents:

Eric W. Abelquist, Ph.D., MBA

Executive Vice President, ORAU

President-elect, HPS

Wednesday, August 31, 2016

Presenting:

What happens to ALARA if LNT hypothesis is abandoned?

Dr. Eric W. Abelquist, ORAU Executive Vice President, works in collaboration with the President/CEO promoting collaboration between ORAU and its university partners, DOE, ORNL, Y-12 and others. A recent UT MBA graduate, Abelquist leads entrepreneurial and innovative initiatives that develop business growth for the organization. He works with the President/CEO in formulating organizational strategic objectives, overseeing key strategic initiatives, community initiatives and best business practices. Abelquist also advises the President/CEO on scientific and engineering issues that advance scientific research and education opportunities. He received a PhD in nuclear engineering from UT Knoxville, and BS and MS degrees in radiation sciences from the UMass-Lowell.

Abelquist is President-elect of the Health Physics Society, working with the President to establish the strategic vision and direction for our Society, and looking forward to visiting our 30+ Chapters.

Abelquist began his 20+ year career at ORAU as a project leader responsible for overseeing a team of health physics technicians and conducting characterization and independent verification surveys at the Department of Energy’s (DOE) and Nuclear Regulatory Commission’s (NRC) sites. He later worked for many years as the survey program’s associate director where, most notably, he contributed to the development and implementation of the Multiagency Radiation Survey and Site Investigation Manual (MARSSIM), and developed the first MARSSIM training course that has now been offered nearly 100 times. Abelquist continues to provide technical assistance in various aspects of decommissioning surveys and has published a textbook entitled Decommissioning Health Physics: A Handbook for MARSSIM Users in 2001, with the 2nd ed. recently published (2014).

Abstract:

Health physicists are specialists in radiation safety, effectively balancing the risks and benefits from activities that involve radiation. The International Commission on Radiological Protection (ICRP) introduced the radiation protection principles of justification and optimization—i.e., no practice involving exposures to radiation should be adopted unless it produces sufficient benefit to the exposed individual (or society) to offset the detriment it causes; optimization requires that the likelihood of incurring exposures, the number of people exposed and the magnitude of their individual exposure should be kept as low as reasonably achievable (ALARA). The linear-non-threshold model (LNT) is responsible for the ALARA principle. LNT assumes a linear dose–response relationship for the induction of cancer and heritable effects, according to which an increment in dose induces a proportional increment in risk, even at low doses. As such, the LNT conveys the message that there is no safe level of radiation dose. LNT is responsible for exaggerated risks at low doses and has resulted in spending limited societal resources to reduce exposures unnecessarily.

What if the radiation safety community abandoned LNT? It likely won’t happen anytime soon (if at all), but it’s constructive to consider how the health physics profession would deal with this game-changer. Abandoning the LNT model radically changes our radiation protection paradigm—if a threshold exists, and low doses of radiation below the threshold are indeed safe, then there is no benefit for driving radiation doses below the threshold (dose limit). In this “no-LNT” scenario, an effective radiation safety program protects against adverse health effects via compliance with appropriate dose limits, with no additional requirement to ensure doses are as low as reasonably achievable. However, we can define a new “ALARA” concept that is used to establish the level (perhaps an administrative dose limit) below the dose limit that is reasonable to achieve—i.e., ALARA serves as a mechanism for setting administrative limit to ensure compliance with dose limits.

Location:

VEGA Americas, Inc. - Cincinnati Campus

4141 Rosslyn Dr., Cincinnati, OH 45209

Schedule:

5:00 pm: VEGA Americas Campus Tour (Optional)

6:00 pm: Dinner

6:30 pm: Welcome and announcements by CRS and OVAIHA Presidents

6:40 pm: Welcome by VEGA and Presentation on Company, Products and Services

7:00 pm: Chapter Business and Speaker

Dinner:

$25.00 per person

No charge for students.

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The Cincinnati Radiation Society Chapter of the Health Physics Society

Presents:

Marcel F. Villani, Ph.D.

North America Technical Director Measurement and Expertise

Canberra Industries, Inc.

June 30, 2016

Presenting:

Fukushima Daiichi Nuclear Power Plant – The Feasibility of Fuel Debris Non-Destructive Assay (NDA) for Waste Management and Nuclear Material Accountancy Purposes

Dr. Marcel F. Villani received his B.S. in Physics (1987), M.S. in Nuclear Physics (1990), and Ph.D. in Nuclear Physics (1992) from the University of Massachusetts/Lowell Campus. After receiving his Ph.D., Marcel performed his post-doctoral work at the University of Kentucky Van de Graaff Facility (1992-1994). Upon completion of his post-doctoral work, Marcel joined Canberra Industries as a scientist (1994) and has held numerous positions in systems engineering, product development and R&D. Currently, Marcel is the North America Technical Director for the Measurement & Expertise (M&E) Division at Canberra. The M&E work involves Non-Destructive Assay (NDA) of Special Nuclear Materials (SNM) including characterization of drummed TRU waste designated for shipment to WIPP, as well as characterizing waste for facilities currently under deactivation and D&D such as the Paducah (Kevil, KY) and Portsmouth (Piketon, OH) Gaseous Diffusion Plants.

Abstract:

The Fukushima Daiichi reactors I-IV suffered severe damage from the great tsunami of March, 2011 which was triggered by a major earthquake. The reactors I-III were in operation and lost all electrical power as the backup generators were destroyed by the tsunami resulting in a melting of the fuel assembly and associated structural materials. The reactors were finally stabilized and the melted fuel and associated assemblies solidified at the bottom of the Primary Containment Vessel (PCV) forming a brittle composition of glass-like material called corium. It is expected that this corium will be broken into small and large fragments called fuel debris. In the last few years, efforts have been switching to removing the fuel debris from the site while following strict guidelines for waste management and nuclear material accountancy. For nuclear material accountancy, special Non-Destructive Assay (NDA) techniques must be employed in what are expected to be extremely harsh environments with respect to activity, decay heat and interfering elements. In the presentation I will frame the waste management and nuclear material accountancy challenges and discuss the proposed NDA techniques that might provide the solutions.

Location:

The Pub at Rookwood Mews

2692 Madison Road Norwood, OH 45208

(513) 841-2748

Schedule:

5:30 pm: Social

6:00 pm: Dinner

7:00 pm: Speaker

Dinner:

$30 Dinner Fee for All Attendees (Includes Dinner and non-alcoholic drinks with refills).

Please note: Alcoholic beverages (cash bar) will be at your own expense.

No charge for students.

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The Cincinnati Radiation Society Chapter of the Health Physics Society

Presents:

Dr. Robert Litman

Environmental Management Services (EMS)

Wednesday, March 30, 2016

Presenting:

High Resolution Gamma Ray Spectrometry Analyses for Normal Operations and Radiological Incident Response

A live discussion / rebroadcast of a NAMP (National Analytical Management Program) webinar. NAMP offers web-based lectures on specific radiochemistry topics developed in cooperation with the EPA, other Federal agencies, and university partners. Each webinar series presents short (1 ½- to 2-hour) webinars on specific radiochemistry topics presented by renowned university professors and leading scientists in radiochemistry. The selected topics are designed to strengthen the participant in areas of professional engineering practice identified by the nuclear industry or national laboratories, including but not limited to actinide chemistry in the environment and in the nuclear fuel cycle.

http://www.wipp.energy.gov/namp/en_content-30-trainingedu.html

Location:

VEGA Americas, Inc. - Cincinnati Campus

4141 Rosslyn Dr., Cincinnati, OH 45209

Schedule:

5:00 pm: Social

6:00 pm: Dinner

7:00 pm: Presentation

Dinner:

$10.00 per person

No charge for students.

Source: www.med.uc.edu

The Cincinnati Radiation Society Chapter of the Health Physics Society

Presents:

Michael Lamba, Ph.D.

Professor in Radiation Oncology and Director of Physics in the Proton Therapy Center at the University of Cincinnati Barrett Cancer Center

February 25, 2016

Presenting:

The Proton Therapy Center at Cincinnati Children’s Hospital / University of Cincinnati Health

Dr. Michael Lamba is a Professor in Radiation Oncology and Director of Physics in the Proton Therapy Center at the University of Cincinnati Barrett Cancer Center. Dr. Lamba received his B.S. in Nuclear Engineering from the University of Virginia and his M.S. in Radiological Sciences and Ph.D. in Medical Physics from the University of Cincinnati. His doctoral thesis involved radiation dose mapping using MRI in a superheated emulsion chamber.

Abstract:

Proton therapy is a significant advance in external beam radiotherapy. The Cincinnati Children’s / UC Health Proton Therapy Center is completing construction and will open its doors for patient treatments in the fall of 2016. This seminar will describe the Bragg peak advantages of proton therapy relative to conventional radiotherapy, the equipment utilized to produce and deliver the proton beams, the treatment process, and the technologies employed. The type of proton beam delivery system used at the facility, pencil beam scanning, is a relatively new technology and there are opportunities for further development. The differences in the biological effects of proton and photon radiation are not well known and require further study. The Cincinnati proton facility will have a treatment gantry dedicated to research – the only U.S. clinical facility with a dedicated research beam. Planned and potential research projects will be discussed. With this highly technical resource employed in a clinical environment there is great potential for the exchange of ideas and collaborative research.

Location:

Cincinnati Children’s Hospital Liberty Township

Proton Therapy Center

7777 Yankee Rd, Liberty Township, OH 45044

Schedule:

6:00 pm: Social

6:30 pm: Dinner

7:00 pm: Presentation & Tour

Dinner:

$5.00 for members

$10.00 for non-members

No charge for students.

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CRS Vendors Meeting

You’re invited to attend the 2012 Vendors Meeting hosted by the Cincinnati Radiation Society!

Vendors such as, ORTEC, LACO, Dade Moeller & Associates, Perkin Elmer, Canberra, Landauer, and ORAU will be presenting information on radiation monitoring devices, emergency response, and technology available for nuclear, health and the environmental industries.

Come discover what these local companies have to offer!

Opportunities for participating as a Vendor are still available, so if you know anyone who may want to participate as a Vendor, please feel free to pass on the attached Vendor Invitation (below). The deadline for applying can be extended at your request.

Also, if any companies who would like to join the CRS as an Affiliate Member - see the Affiliate Membership Form (below)!

Vendors and Attendees will need to RSVP for this event at: meeting@crs-hps.org

The Cincinnati Radiation Society of the Health Physics Society

Presents:

Marily Goske, M.D.

Tuesday, March 6, 2012

Marilyn J. Goske, M.D., is the Corning Benton Endowed Chair for Radiology Education and staff radiologist at Cincinnati Children’s Hospital Medical Center in Cincinnati, Ohio. With special expertise in ultrasound and gastrointestinal imaging, Dr. Goske is a nationally-recognized pediatric radiologist primarily focused on medical and web-based education for pediatric radiology residents and fellows. She is the past Chairman of the Board of Trustees for the Society for Pediatric Radiology (SPR). As former president of SPR, she is the founder and chair of the national Image Gently campaign focusing on using kid-sized imaging, rather than adult-sized, for children in the United States. This international campaign brings together 50 organizations representing more than 600,000 imaging specialists who are involved in pediatrics, radiology, physics and radiology technology. Dr. Goske has written and presented extensively on subjects relating to professional standards of practice and patient care in radiology and has been published in of books, scientific journals and on-line publications. She currently is a reviewer for Pediatric Radiology and the American Journal of Roentgenology.

Dr. Goske earned a medical degree at the University of Connecticut School of Medicine in Farmington, Conn., in 1977. She completed a residency in diagnostic radiology, served as chief resident and completed her fellowship in pediatric radiology at Strong Memorial Hospital in Rochester, N.Y., an affiliate of The University of Rochester. Dr. Goske also completed a fellowship in medical education in 2005 at The Cleveland Clinic Lerner College of Medicine’s Division of Education in Cleveland, Ohio. While at the Cleveland Clinic she and Dr. Janet Reid, her associate, developed a comprehensive Web-based pediatric radiology curriculum that is widely used by radiology residency programs throughout the United States.

Abstract:

Benefits of medical imaging that use ionizing radiation are well known. However, there is concern that growing use may place children at increased risk for cancer later in life. Dr. Goske’s talk discusses the reasons behind the concern, the relative risk from different imaging studies and provides an update on a new patient specific dose estimate for CT. Computerized tomography is one of the greatest medical innovations in this century. CT scan’s capability to “see” inside the human body quickly and painlessly has helped revolutionize medical care throughout the world. Yet, recent reports of medical error indicate that overdose from CT scans does occur. It behooves the medical community to act aggressively to lower radiation dose during medical imaging. Children are more susceptible to changes in their cells from a given dose of radiation compared to adults. Another key difference between adults and children is that children have more remaining years of life during which radiation-induced cancer could develop. Finally, we know from phantom or simulation studies that if a child has a CT scan using an adult technique, the child’s dose is greater. This talk will discuss imaging risk and the role of the Image Gently campaign in informing medical professionals what they can do to promote radiation protection for children locally. Image GentlySM is an education and awareness campaign to promote radiation protection for children worldwide. Sponsored by the Alliance for Radiation Safety in Pediatric Imaging, a consortium of more than 64 groups that represents over 800,000 health care professionals, the campaign hopes to change practice locally. www.imagegently.org

In conclusion of the presentation, participants will be able to understand the factors in the United States that have led to the concern regarding medical imaging and radiation in children, understand the basic risk associated with performance of CT scans, and identify factors that make children more susceptible to radiation compared to adults. Furthermore, the audience will be able to review imaging tests and their relative radiation dose, discuss the AAPM new patient dose estimate, SSDE, as well as discuss the Image Gently campaign and list resources for parents and physicians with questions regarding radiation dose and imaging studies in children.

CINCINNATI RADIATION SOCIETY

Holiday Dinner and Meeting

Thursday, December 8th, 2011

Join the Cincinnati Radiation Society at the Golden Lamb in Lebanon, OH for a festive Holiday dinner and meeting to be presented by:

Doug Draper

Topic: The Great Mound Diamond Caper

Doug Draper joined the Cincinnati Radiation Society in 1983. He became the Society’s President-Elect in 1985, and in the same year he became the captain of the Mound Radiological Assistance Team. In this capacity he led a team of Health Physics personnel that responded to various emergency responses as directed by DOE Region 5 located at Argonne National Laboratory. For our meeting, Doug will share one of the more interesting callouts of the Mound Radiological Assistance Team, which he describes as "The Great Mound Diamond Caper."

Source: www.soapboxmedia.com

Location:

The Golden Lamb Inn

27 S. Broadway

Lebanon, OH 45036

(513) 932-5065

Schedule:

6:00 pm: Social

6:30 pm: Dinner

8:00 pm: Speaker

Dinner:

Cost based on dinner selection (see below).

Please reply to meeting@crs-hps.org with your choice of entrée and dessert and the number of guests you will bring by December 5th at the latest. Guests and spouses are encouraged to attend.

* Meeting will be on the Second Level Floor; CASH BAR available on second level only (credit on lower level).

*PLEASE NOTE: Second Story Level is only accessible by stairs (no elevator- this is a historic building).

The Cincinnati Radiation Society of the Health Physics Society

Presents:

Armin Ansari, Ph.D., CHP

Health Physics Society President-Elect

Thursday, September 22, 2011

Presentation Topic: Grassroots Preparedness, a Radiation Risk Scale, & Marketing of Health Physics

Armin is a health physicist at the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) serving as subject matter expert in CDC’s radiation emergency preparedness and response activities. Armin received both his BS and PhD degrees in radiation biophysics from the University of Kansas, starting his career as a radiation biologist, and did his postdoctoral research at Oak Ridge and Los Alamos National Laboratories. He was a senior scientist with the radiological consulting firm of Auxier & Associates before joining CDC in 2002. Armin was the lead author of the CDC guide for state and local public health planners on population monitoring, and a contributing author to the federal Planning Guidance for Response to a Nuclear Detonation. He was the 2009 recipient of Excellence in Public Health Practice Award from the National Center for Environmental Health, and a 2011 recipient of Outstanding Achievement Award from Conference of Radiation Control Program Directors. Armin is also an adjunct associate professor of nuclear and radiological engineering at Georgia Institute of Technology, a member of Georgia East Metro Medical Reserve Corps, and a member of Gwinnett County Community Emergency Response Team. He recently published the text book Radiation Threats and Your Safety: A Guide to Preparation and Response for Professionals and Community. Armin had served on the Board of Directors of the Health Physics Society (HPS), and was recently elected by its membership to serve as President-Elect.

Abstract:

This presentation has three distinct segments. The first segment discusses the significant impact that radiation professionals (health and medical physicists, nuclear medicine professionals, radiologic technologists, nuclear engineers, and others) can make toward better preparing their local communities for response to a radiation emergency. An available funding opportunity to facilitate recruitment and training of local radiation professionals into existing local volunteer registries is described. In the second segment, a Radiation Risk Scale is proposed as a simple tool for communicating radiation risk to the public, leaders, and decision makers. This scaling system offers several distinct advantages: a) It is simple; 2) It conveys meaning and provides a frame of reference immediately; c) It does not require any understanding or use of radiation units or any mention of radiation dose rates or radioactivity levels; d) It is not affected by differences in specific national or international radiation dose limits, concentration limits, or other regulatory standards; and e) it can be used during an emergency situation or in its aftermath to promote responsible action by the public. The third and final segment of the presentation addresses the need to market the profession of health physics. An idea is presented and audience opinion and feedback is solicited using an anonymous multiple choice form.

Location:

Marriott Kingsgate Conference Center (at The University of Cincinnati)

151 Goodman Drive

Cincinnati, OH 45219

(513) 487-3800

Schedule:

6:00 pm: Social

6:30 pm: Dinner

8:00 pm: Speaker

Dinner:

$30.00 for members

$35.00 for non-members & guests

(Please reserve. Don’t reserve and not show. The CRS will be charged for a minimum of 20 attendees.)

Dinner is a buffet – non-alcoholic beverages will be included, and a cash bar is available for alcoholic beverages. Both the technical meeting and dinner will be in the Caminetto Private Room.

RSVP at meeting@crs-hps.org by September 20, 2011

Annual $10 dues can be paid at the meeting.

Next Meeting: The Vendors Meeting is scheduled at Vinoklet Winery & Vineyard mid-October; the exact date is to be announced.

We will be voting on a new President-elect, and on a fellow position for the CRS Board at this upcoming meeting. We are seeking nominations for both positions. There is currently one nominee for each position. If anyone else is interested in giving a nomination, please contact CRS President Eva Dupuis-Nouillé at emdupuisn@gmail.com before September 20th.

In addition, we are seeking volunteers to support the CRS in performing Science Teacher Workshops. A committee will be formed to make this happen for Cincinnati and possibly other districts. Individuals with contacts to administrators/coordinators for the accreditation process would be especially helpful. If anyone else is interested please contact CRS President Eva Dupuis-Nouillé at emdupuisn@gmail.com. Additional details will be discussed at the next meeting.

Cincinnati Radiation Society of the Health Physics Society

Presents:

Brant Ulsh, Ph.D., CHP

Wednesday, April 13, 2011

Recent Research Concerning Biological Responses to Low Doses of Ionizing Radiation

Dr. Brant Ulsh is a Research Health Scientist with the National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health, where he has worked since 2003. Dr. Ulsh is a certified health physicist, and he holds a PhD in Radiological Health Sciences from Colorado State University, and a MS in Health Physics and a BS in Nuclear Engineering, both from the University of Cincinnati. Dr. Ulsh has diverse work experience ranging from regulatory compliance at nuclear power plants, to environmental monitoring at DOE sites, and most recently dose reconstruction for the largest radiation worker compensation program in the world. Dr. Ulsh’s research interests and expertise focus on the biological and environmental responses to low doses of radiation, and occupational radiation dose reconstruction.

Abstract:

This presentation will focus on recent research – what it tells us and what it doesn’t tell us, about biological responses to low doses of ionizing radiation. Brant will also discuss the recent catastrophe (on March 11, 2011) and the unfolding nuclear and environmental events in Japan, in addition to some observations on how the press, public, and scientific community reacted to these events, and whether or not these reactions are consistent with what we know about risks.

Location:

Twin Dragon Restaurant

7763 Tylersville Road (near Cox Road and Tylersville Rd.)

West Chester, OH

Schedule:

6:00 PM (Social), 6:30 PM (Dinner), 8:00 PM (Speaker)


Dinner is a buffet – non-alcoholic beverages will be included, alcoholic beverages will be on your own.

Dinner fee for members $20 ($25 for non-members). If you plan to attend the meeting, but do not eat, you will still be charged the above fees (restaurant policy for small parties in their private room).

Also if you have not paid your dues ($10) for the Fall 2010/Spring 2011 CRS membership, please have it paid during this meeting time.

Next meeting: Mid-May (date is TBD)

Please RSVP for this meeting at meeting@crs-hps.org ASAP.

Cincinnati Radiation Society of the Health Physics Society

Presents:

Health Physics Society President-Elect

Associate and Senior Health Physicist

Dade Moeller & Associates

Wednesday September 17, 2009

Presentation Topic:

New Concepts in Radiological Emergency Planning

Location:

O’Charley’s (Tri County)

O'Charley's

4531 Eastgate Blvd.

Cincinnati , OH 45245

(513) 753-6266

(which is about a half mile south of the Mall on SR 747,

and on the right side of the street if you’re going south)

Social Time: 6:00 - 6:30 pm

Dinner: 6:30 - 7:45 pm

Presentation: 8:00 pm

Fee for Dinner:

Members: $30

Non-Members, Guests: $35

Dues are $10 per year

We will meet at O’Charley’s (Tri County), which is about a half mile south of the Mall on SR 747, and on the right side of the street if you’re going south. Social hour will be from 6:00 to 6:30, then we will be seated so they can take our menu selections. They plan to offer sirloin with one side and salad or soup, grilled chicken with rice and one side, salmon with one side and salad or soup, and a grilled chicken salad. Non-alcoholic beverages and a dessert will also be served. The desserts choices will be chocolate cake, key lime pie and caramel pie. Technical speaker to start at 8:00.

Please respond to meeting@crs-hps.org ASAP or by Sept. 14, 2009

We will also be collecting nominations and holding elections for the following offices:

President Elect of the Cincinnati Radiation Society and Secretary

Please respond to the meeting@crs-hps.org

Please join us for the next CRS Meeting on Wednesday, September 17, 2008 at the Kingsgate Marriott near the University of Cincinnati in Clifton. The President Elect of the national Health Physics Society, Howard Dickson, will be presenting. Social time: 6:00 pm, Dinner at 6:30 to 7:15, and presentation at 7:30 pm. There will be a buffet featuring chicken, fish, beef, salad, side dishes, one non alcoholic drink, dessert, and a cash bar. Please see the link to see the possible menu and directions. www.kingsgatemarriott.com The fee for dinner will be $30 for members and $35 for non members. Dues are $10 per year and can be paid at the meeting.

Please RSVP by responding to this email or send an email to meeting@crs-hps.org.


USTUR Whole Body Case 0682: 23-y Follow-up of the 238Pu Glove Box Explosion at Mound

Anthony (Tony) C. James, Ph.D.

Director, USTUR

Research Professor, College of Pharmacy

WSU Tri-Cities Campus, Richland, WA

Dinner Presentation to the Cincinnati Radiation Society, Tuesday, April 18th, 2006

20:00 – 21:00

Anderson et al. (1970) published an early health physics assessment (Health Phys. 18:631-639) of three workers contaminated in the 1968 explosion of a 238Pu glove box at the Mound Laboratory, Miamisburg. This USTUR whole body donor (Case 0682) was ‘Employee C’ in that assessment. He died in 1991 at age 71 y, from an acute myocardial infarction, with incidental findings of adenomatous hyperplasia of the prostate and non-malignant meningioma.

USTUR has not previously published the results of the radiochemical analyses performed in this case. Unfortunately, all samples of soft tissues were ‘lost’ due to freezer malfunction. However, measurements of the 238Pu activity retained in a comprehensive sample of the skeleton were obtained. These could be compared with USTUR’s previously published measurements of all tissues from an accidental 238PuO2 ceramic particle inhalation at Los Alamos National Laboratory [Case 0259: Health Phys. 84:2-33 (2003)]. Simultaneous analysis of the fecal and urinary excretion data in the Mound case, together with the 238Pu activity retained in the skeleton, clearly indicated exposure to a bi-modal 238Pu aerosol. This was comprised primarily of large, insoluble 238PuO2 particles, with a secondary component of 238PuO2 ‘smoke.’ Most of the systemic uptake (and organ dose) resulted from the inhaled ‘smoke.’

Dr. James will describe the methods used to analyze the bioassay and skeletal data in this case, and the calculated doses received by the major body organs. These ‘actual’ doses will be compared with the estimates made by the health physicists at the time of the accident.

For more information, please contact Dr. Sam Glover, NIOSH/OCAS, Cincinnati, OH, seg3@cdc.gov, (513) 533-6829.